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How to use your LinkedIn profile to land your next job


LinkedIn has been around for a very long time now and has over 106 million active users worldwide with the UK being one of the most active countries on the site. LinkedIn gets a bad reputation as the poor cousin of sexy social media like Facebook and Twitter but used in the right way our profile on LinkedIn can help you land a new marketing job.

LinkedIn is a marketers dream

If you are working in marketing, or trying to make a break into the industry, you really must have an active LinkedIn profile page. Using LinkedIn is about more than just having an online CV, that’s just one element of the site. If you leverage all the aspects the site offers you might just be able to land your dream role.

Here’s our run down of the tactics you can employ to help you land your next marketing career move using LinkedIn to market yourself.

Complete your LinkedIn profile

It sounds obvious, but so many people don’t complete their profiles on LinkedIn. The summary section is very much like your own personal mission statement where you can tell people generally all about you and what your motivations are. Ensure that all your previous roles have short descriptions of what your role was, your responsibilities and achievements. Use straightforward language and avoid cliché – this isn’t The Wolf of Wall Street!

Have a decent head shot

How to use your LinkedIn profile to land your next job

Imagine you’re off for an interview and dress accordingly, have someone with a half decent camera take a picture of you with a plain background to make sure you can be seen clearly.

Shots of you to avoid

  • On the beach
  • Pouting in a hat
  • With your arm around your best friend
  • Your baby
  • Looking like you just got out of bed

Employers will very often look-up candidates on LinkedIn before an interview so a bad LinkedIn profile picture could cause you problems before you even arrive for an interview.

Get recommendations

As a marketer you understand that brands use testimonials to great effect. So do the same for yourself, an endorsement from another person who’s worked with you previously goes a long way. Think back to people you’ve worked with before, it doesn’t have to be an employer - trusted colleagues and people you’ve collaborated with are just as good, and ask them to give you a recommendation on LinkedIn.

Make sure you pay the favour back as well, being a nice person online goes a long way.

Share updates and publish posts

If you want a career in marketing, you have to show you can do it. Make sure you’re sharing updates about the business you are currently working for, it might help you land a promotion at your present company!

Write and publish posts to your own profile on the marketing and PR industry. This shows that you are interested in your topic and will build your personal brand as an expert. Businesses want to hire experts!

Join in discussions

LinkedIn is full of groups where questions are asked. If you can pop on a give a concise reply which answers the question you’ll build your reputation. Equally don’t be scared to ask questions in forums, they may lead to interesting discussions where your skills are exactly what’s needed.

Follow Network Marketing

Our final and most important tip – follow the Network Marketing LinkedIn page. We post all our latest marketing roles there, before they go anywhere else. By following us you’ll get the first chance to apply.

Good luck with your job search using LinkedIn. If you have any more tips, ideas or questions pop them in the comments section at the bottom of the post and we’ll do our best to answer them for you.


Author

Julie Storey

Julie's our go to person for all of the operations within the business, although that's not to say that she hasn't still got some great relationships with clients. She set up our creative recruitment business back in 2004 and has been leading operations ever since. Never one to shirk on buying a round at the bar, she'll more than likely be the last one standing.

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